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Welcome to the El Paso Matters voters guide for the May 26, 2020, Republican and Democratic runoff elections in El Paso County.

Voters frequently express concerns that they don’t have enough information about candidates. This guide is meant to serve as an introduction to the candidates.

El Paso Matters is focusing on local races in our voters guide, but the May 26 ballot also includes runoff elections for several state offices. For statewide races, we recommend the voters guide produced by the League of Women Voters of Texas.

 

Under Texas law, runoff elections are necessary when no candidate receives a majority of votes cast in a primary. If you voted in the March 3 primary, you can only vote in the runoff for the party you chose then. If you are registered to vote and didn’t cast a ballot March 3, you can choose to vote in either the Republican or Democratic runoff. 

 

Sample ballots for the runoff have not yet been prepared. El Paso Matters will provide links to sample ballots as soon as the county elections office posts them.

 

If you have any questions about the election process, go to the El Paso County Elections Department website or call them at 915-546-2154.

Follow our latest Election News here.

Registration deadline – The last day to register to vote for the runoff election is April 27.

Early Voting – Early voting for the May 26 runoff is May 18-22. 

Where to vote early –  El Paso County early voting sites have not yet been posted. El Paso Matters will provide a link as soon as the elections office posts the polling places. You will be able to vote at whatever location is most convenient.

Vote by mail – Some Texans can vote by mail. To cast a mail ballot, you must meet one of these criteria: age 65 or over; disabled; be out of the county on election day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance; or be confined in jail, but otherwise eligible. The deadline to apply for a mail ballot is May 15.

Election Day – If you vote on Election Day May 26, polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. If you vote on May 26, you must do so at your assigned neighborhood precinct. 

Candidate Profiles

We sent questionnaires to all candidates in contested primary races in El Paso County and gave candidates at least two weeks to respond. We emailed the questionnaires to email addresses the candidates provided when filing for their office. We sent several reminders when we didn’t get responses, even after deadlines passed. We were able to obtain responses from a vast majority of candidates. We asked the candidates to limit responses to 100 words. Responses are lightly edited for grammar.

383rd District Judge

What the job entails: This judge presides over family law cases such as divorces, child custody and protective orders.

Who can vote: All registered voters in El Paso County.



388th District Judge

What the job entails: This judge presides over family law cases such as divorces, child custody and protective orders.

Who can vote: All registered voters in El Paso County.



District attorney

What the position entails: According to the Texas Association of Counties, the district attorney analyzes and gathers evidence to determine if there are grounds for criminal prosecution of cases within their districts and presents cases at trial.

Who can vote: Registered voters in El Paso, Culberson and Hudspeth counties.



County Commissioner Precinct 3

What the position entails: According to the Texas Association of Counties, the county commissioner is responsible for roads and bridges within their precinct and makes policy-making budget decisions. Four commissioners, elected from a quarter of the county’s population, serve along with the county judge on the Commissioners Court.

Who can vote: All registered voters in Precinct 3, which includes the Lower Valley and parts of Central and East El Paso. See a map here or call the county elections office at 915-546-2154 to confirm that you can vote in this race.

16th Congressional District

What the position entails: The House of Representatives is made up of 435 members from the 50 states. Representatives introduce bills and resolutions, offer amendments and serve on committees. 

Who can vote: Texas’ 16th Congressional District covers most of the city limits of El Paso, as well as unincorporated areas of northwestern and eastern El Paso County. See a map here or call the county elections office at 915-546-2154 to confirm that you can vote in this race.

23rd Congressional District

What the position entails: The House of Representatives is made up of 435 members from the 50 states. Representatives introduce bills and resolutions, offer amendments and serve on committees. 


Who can vote: Texas’ 23rd Congressional District is one of the largest by geography in the country, stretching from the eastern part of El Paso County to San Antonio. In El Paso County, the district includes parts of the Lower Valley in the city limits of El Paso as well as the towns of Socorro, Fabens, Tornillo, San Elizario and Horizon City. See a map here or call the county elections office at 915-546-2154 to confirm that you can vote in this race.